Manchester team to make dementia music app

Stephen Chapman's picture
by Stephen Chapman

Manchester Camerata, The University of Manchester and Social Sense have come together to create an app to help people living with dementia.

Music in Mind Remote has just received funding as part of the Healthy Ageing Challenge.

Manchester Camerata, described as Britain's "most adventurous orchestra," has been running the Music In Mind programme for people with dementia and their carers since 2012.

“We are extremely grateful to have received this grant from the UKRI on behalf of Music in Mind Remote Ltd. This initial funding, together with the unprecedented investment from four NHS Clinical Commissioning Groups, has enabled us to begin the development stages of the app,” said Bob Riley, Chief Executive of Manchester Camerata.

“None of this would be possible without the significant involvement of the University of Manchester whose vital research has enabled us to impact thousands of people through our Music in Mind programme. We are proud that together we are able to combine the research and expertise of Manchester Camerata and the University of Manchester with cutting-edge technology to create an app that can hopefully impact people living with dementia and their carers for years to come.”

Music in Mind Remote has recruited Bev Taylor, a former Social Prescribing Lead for NHS England and Improvement, to become its CEO.

The app will be designed and developed by Social Sense. It will train carers in basic music therapy-based techniques and provide resources to people living with dementia and evaluate their responses. Once it has been through development and testing, it will be rolled out nationwide.

“We are very pleased that Music in Mind Remote Ltd has been able to secure this funding. The online program being developed by the new company, based on the research, IP, and practices developed by the Manchester Camerata and The University of Manchester, is going to make a huge positive impact on the lives of thousands of people affected by dementia,” added Andrew Wilkinson, Chief Executive of The University of Manchester Innovation Factory.

“Supporting this project is of prime importance to the Innovation Factory as it demonstrates how partnerships between the University and organisations like the Manchester Camerata can create enormous social benefit.”

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