Oldham Evening Chronicle launches lifestyle magazine

The new owners of the Oldham Evening Chronicle have joined forces with Cornerstone to produce a lifestyle magazine.

Signature is being published by radio station Revolution 96.2, which bought the Oldham Evening Chronicle group of titles from administrators KPMG in the autumn.

The 52-page magazine includes recipes from Master Chef winner, Simon Wood, plus a column from Olympic hockey player, Nicola White.

It is the third magazine title to be published by the group, after The Knowledge and Oldham Business Edge. These have also been designed by Oldham agency, Cornerstone, led by graphic designer Nicola Adamson.

“It’s great to see Signature magazine hitting the streets. It looks fantastic and has far exceeded our expectations for the first edition. We are developing new local media products and services, and Signature is part of our exciting plans. We’re really looking forward to developing all three magazines throughout 2018,” said Revolution 96.2 managing director Matt Ramsbottom.

“We have also made significant headway in recent weeks with the Oldham Chronicle newspaper. We have done a lot of preparation work and hope to announce a print date in the very near future.”

A number of original Chronicle editorial staff are involved in the new magazines including education and feature writer Karen Doherty, photographer Darren Robinson, journalist Simon Smedley and motoring reviewer Steven Berry. They are now working as freelancers.

Robbie MacDonald, the ex business editor at the paper, who is now employed at Cornerstone, has acted as contributing editor for the magazine launches. 

Meanwhile, the former home of the Chronicle has gone up for sale.

The 33,131sq ft building including a printing hall is being marketed by Lambert Smith Hampton.

“The Oldham Evening Chronicle has been a mainstay of the town for generations and its offices were well-known to most people in the area,” said associate director, Paul Parker.

“It stands adjacent to another local landmark site - the former YMCA building on Prince Street - and the area is primed for redevelopment.”

The paper ceased publication earlier this year, after its owners, Hirst, Kidd & Rennie went into administration.