Twentyone helps launch Plush into luxury car market

Stephen Chapman's picture
by Stephen Chapman

A start-up, which manufactures leather booster seats for the luxury and supercar sector, has appointed Twentyone.

The Blackburn-based digital marketing agency helped name, design and build the brand, before creating and managing its marketing strategy.

Plush Tush was founded by entrepreneur Susie Wilson and its seats meet industry standards, as well as having a smooth base, to avoid scuffs on the leather car’s leather:

“I have always been car mad and after twenty years working in finance for blue-chip companies I was on the lookout for an entrepreneurial idea of my own.  I have a BMW Z4 and when I was looking for a car seat for my six-year-old daughter, I found there were no seats to match the interior.  On doing some research, I realised I had discovered a gap in the market, and the idea for Plush was born.”

The product is now available online and through a number of selected dealerships in Lancashire and London.

“We worked with PLUSH to conduct extensive research into the luxury automotive market. After a successful naming exercise, we scamped out a vision for the company brand and its first product offering – from this, the Plush Company and Plush Tush were born,” explained agency director Sam Fletcher.

“We approached the project with a single, clear aim in mind: to communicate its core values of comfort, luxury, design and quality.

“The new brand and creative elements were rolled out across all customer touch points, including a new responsive website featuring high-definition product photography.  We also designed point of sale and print material to support the business development team in targeting strategic partners in luxury vehicle dealerships.

“We also conducted blogger outreach campaign that put the client in front of key influencers within the automotive sector.”

The law changed on March 1st and manufacturers aren’t allowed to introduce new models of backless booster seats for children under 125cm or weighing less than 22kg. But the law change doesn’t affect existing models, nor does it mean that they are illegal.