New look ID2

Filming has started on a sequel to revered 1995 cult football hooliganism classic, ID.

ID2, becomes the latest feature film project backed by Screen Yorkshire’s Yorkshire Content Fund. The production, which takes a hard-edged look at police infiltration of football hooligan gangs, is shooting on location in Hull throughout March and April.

Screen Yorkshire head of investments Hugo Heppell, said many people may not be aware that the original ID, was also set in London, shot in Yorkshire.

“We’re delighted that 20 years on we have been able to support the production to return here to film the sequel. With key cast and crew reunited from the original production, alongside exciting new filmmaking talent, we’re confident that it has the makings of another cult British classic.”

Hull will double for Rotterdam’s red light district in ID2 and its sporting locations, buildings and local extras will provide a backdrop to the fictional football team Shadwell Town. The University of Hull is hosting the film’s production offices and and its producers have given a group of students trainee placements as part of their commitment to education.


As it was – ID

ID2 is written by Vincent O´Connell (ID, Criminal) and directed by Joel Novoa (God’s Slave). It is produced by Sally Hibbin for Parallax (ID, Raining Stones and Yasmin) and Patrick Cassavetti (Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas, Emma, The State Within). ID2 stars Lee Ross, Richard Graham and Perry Fenwick, who all appeared in the original production, alongside leads Linus Roache, Simon Rivers and Neil Pearson.

The plot centres on a new mosque erected in the middle of a rundown East London estate, next to the decrepit football ground of Shadwell Town FC, giving rise to local tensions and opportunities for a far right group who wish to exploit the conflicts politically.

DC Mohammed Anwari, a young and ambitious British Muslim undercover cop, is given the task of shadowing the Shadwell football gang on their unexpected European adventures, and finds himself faced with critical questions of identity, culture and loyalty.

It is the second time in the past year that Hull (City of Culture 2017) has been selected for a major feature film; its period streets and buildings doubled for London in A Royal Night Out (previously known as Girls Night Out), a VE day feature also backed by Screen Yorkshire and set for cinematic release in the UK this May.