BBC Yorkshire is to team up with BBC Two to produce a three-part documentary series marking the 50th anniversary of the Pennine Way.

Officially opened in 1965, the 268-mile trail stretches from Edale in the Derbyshire Peak District to Kirk Yetholm on the Scottish Border, taking in some of Britain’s most rugged and spectacular countryside along the way.

The 3 x 30” series will see polar explorer and ocean diver Paul Rose explore the Way’s history, geography and flora and fauna.

Paul Rose

Paul Rose

He’ll cover the highest pub in England, the Roman excavations at Hadrian’s Wall, the red squirrels of Northumberland and the blustery Helm Wind of Cumbria.

“The Pennine Way goes right through the very heart of the North and has been enjoyed by walkers, nature lovers and serious hikers for 50 years,” said executive producer Nicola Addyman. “We’re delighted that Paul Rose is going to focus his incredibly well-travelled gaze on such a treasured national trail.”

Rose added: “I’ve spent my life leading science expeditions to the most remote and challenging places on earth. I’ve skied across the Greenland Icecap, made first ascents of Arctic mountains, run an Antarctic Research Station and dived in some of the most hostile regions of the ocean.

“Yet right here on my doorstep is the Pennine Way – a world class challenge! It was a delight to discover that it is such a beautiful, powerful and demanding adventure. Exploring the Pennine Way has been surprising, a privilege and huge amounts of fun.”

Set for transmission next year, the co-production will first be shown on BBC One in Yorkshire followed by a network broadcast on BBC Two. Commissioned by BBC Two controller Kim Shillinglaw, the series is produced by BBC Yorkshire’s Paul Greenan with executive producer, Nicola Addyman.