artcadeCan people be encouraged to give more to charity by taking on some aspects of computer games? Liverpool’s creative agency Uniform thinks so and helped come up with this installation called the Artcade Machine.

The installation consists of three giant LED pixels that respond to people’s donations by changing colour. By altering the colour of the pixels people create their own unique light installation in the arts venue.

In the spirit of classic computer games the ArtCade machine also has a few hidden ‘easter eggs’ waiting to be discovered.

Uniform worked with Dundee Contemporary Arts (DCA) and the games company Denki to create it.

Managing Director of Denki, Colin Anderson, said it was all about engagement. “We had to create something that not only asked for donations but gave something back. The most successful route was to create something that was playful. We needed something that was physical and tangible. This was beyond any skills we have. “

Pete Thomas, futures director at Uniform, said: “There were quite a few constraints to the project and it was important that what we created reflected the scope of activities at the DCA. Working with light we’ve enabled people to play and explore the basic colour theory that underpins much visual art and combined it with a nod to an 8-bit aesthetic. The result is quite simple, very addictive and hopefully beautiful!”

The project is a companion piece to an installation by Edinburgh based creative studio Lucky Frame that considers how gaming can be used to enhance visitor engagement at the venue.

The companies were commissioned by DCA following support from the Digital R&D Fund for Arts and Culture Organisations in Scotland, funded by Nesta, Creative Scotland and the Arts and Humanities Research Council.