James TaylorManchester’s aspiration to being a world-leading digital city has attracted prominent IT provider Comtec to set up an office in the city.

The office at Piccadilly House is lead by James Taylor and will be focusing on solutions to current business issues such as datacentres and will be working closely with Cisco, Aruba, APC by Schneider Electric and Flexpod.

Taylor, who has been recruited from Schneider Electric to launch the new office and establish it as a local focal point for the company’s customers in the North West said they were was excited to be a part of the region’s growth.

He said: “As the UK’s largest regional economy and a thriving technology community, we look forward to participating in the creation of new jobs and helping businesses continue to grow and thrive.

“We have a significant and growing client base in the North West and we see the new Manchester office as a strategic imperative in ensuring we can deliver the best service and solutions to our growing customer base. We are open for business in Manchester as of today and within a 2 hour radius is approximately 60% of UK businesses and 20 million people.

Tim Newns, chief executive of MIDAS, Manchester’s inward investment agency, said he was delighted Comtec has chosen to invest in Manchester.

“The environment is right for success – as the second largest digital hub in Europe and the UK fastest growing regional economy, Manchester offers significant market opportunities. This coupled with access to big multi-nationals and start ups, there are some exciting opportunities for Comtec to explore and I look forward to seeing them thrive here.”

Growth in Manchester’s IT sector has increased by over 50% in the last decade, outstripping anywhere else in the UK at nearly 5 times the national average. The Manchester region also boasts a potential workforce of 7.2m within a 50 mile radius includes 17 Universities producing 117,000 graduates each year. Comtec’s Manchester office will focus on the region from the Scottish Border to a line crossing Wales and England below the Midlands.